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Senat Policy Papers: 1998
The Release of Palestinian Prisoners

Senat #80, December 1998

ABSTRACT

The first stage in the planned release of Palestinian prisoners, in compliance with the terms of the Wye Memorandum, left the Palestinian social and political leadership stunned. The release of 150 criminals, as well as 100 other prisoners —according to the Palestinians, the majority of these prisoners were not really held for security offences; furthermore, they included only a small number of the “Fatah fighters”, several of whom were scheduled to be released within a few months — represented a public insult.

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The Wye River Memorandum and Its Implications for the Peace Process

Senat #73, November 1998

ABSTRACT

The Wye River Memorandum breathed new life into the political process conducted between Israel and the Palestinians, and reawakened hopes for the resumption of negotiations aimed at reaching a peace agreement between the two sides. Among broad segments of the Israeli public, the memorandum was perceived as a visible manifestation of the ideology of peace fostered by the late Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin. To them, the agreement represented a further step on the road toward a permanent settlement with the Palestinians, one that would bring an end to the Israeli-Arab conflict.

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The Second “Beat” — Percentages and Security Considerations

Senat #64, July 1998

ABSTRACT

The Israeli government argues, and undoubtedly quite rightly, that even if political agreements were to be reached with all our neighbours, especially the Palestinian Authority, they would still not guarantee our arrival at the pacific shores that would allow us to forego military readiness and the capability to confront the threats to our security that may arise if, heaven forbid, the agreements prove to be worthless.

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Public Attitudes Concerning Women’s Representation in Local Government

Senat #60, May 1998

ABSTRACT

This report presents the findings of a survey on public attitudes concerning women’s suitability for local government and the disposition to support women candidates for public office (i.e., mayors, heads of local council or local council members). The survey was conducted during the second week of April 1998, among a representative sample (512 interviewees) of Israel’s Jewish population.

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Khatami’s Election as President of Iran: Does It Really Bear Tidings of Change?

Senat #58, November 1998

ABSTRACT

Khatami, who achieved an impressive victory in the May 1997 elections for president of Iran, attained another important success when the Majles, Iran’s parliament, confirmed all 22 of his candidates to ministerial posts (20 August 1997).

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The Israeli Public’s Attitudes toward Wage Earners from Foreign Countries: A Comparison of Survey Results, 1995 — 1997

Senat #56, July 1998

ABSTRACT

As a result of the 1993 border closings, the number of wage earners from foreign countries employed in Israel increased substantially. Conservative estimates place their current number at 250,000, half of whom are illegal (i.e., lacking work permits). It is commonly believed that their presence is the direct result of short-term security problems; therefore, the phenomenon can be ignored (for instance, on the municipal level) or eliminated by means of swift deportation.

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A New Settlement Policy for the Negev Bedouins

Senat #47, April 1998

ABSTRACT

For centuries prior to 1948, the year the State of Israel was established, the Bedouin nomads had been the Negev’s almost exclusive residents. The size of the community, in 1947, was approximately 90,000, whose members belonged to about 90 tribes. By 1948, the majority of the population was already occupied in agriculture. Only a small minority continued to be engaged solely as shepherds, roaming with their flocks along rather limited perimeters from their settlements.

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